After a peaceful night camping on the mountain we fried our breakfast and stopped a passing car to establish whether or not either of the dirt roads by our camp led to our next stop – Kavaklidere. 

After a peaceful night camping on the mountain we fried our breakfast and stopped a passing car to establish whether or not either of the dirt roads by our camp led to our next stop – Kavaklidere.  They didn’t.  We had to go most of the way back along the roads travelled the previous day, and emerge on to the main road to pass Yatagan and turn right for Kavaklidere.  Which turned out to be an old town, with lots of old stone houses still in use (though they are rapidly being demolished to make way for the usual concrete/brick monolithic apartment blocks) and a traditional trade in copper.  The {mosimage}downtown wing of Fethiye Times had long coveted a traditional Turkish mangal (Ottoman indoor charcoal burner for heating) and we had high hopes of finding the mangal in the copper shops here.  And we did.  Thanks to the father and son team of Celal and Unal Koroglu we not only bought a wonderful olf managal for a great price, but they threw in free gifts – two copper Turkish coffee makers and an old copper decorative piece from the top of a mosque.

We then decided to carry on up the road a while to Mentese, where there is a cave called Yerkupe which we felt might be worth a visit.  As we left Kavaklidere disaster struck, and the Fethiye Times ancient gas-fired Turkish car started emitting creaking noises from the steering column.  Fortunately the driver is also a good amateur mechanic and after a brief stop while he looked under the bonnet, and took various bits off the steering column, he pronounced it OK to drive and we carried on. 

The Yerkupe Cave turned out to be closed for Ramazan so we decided to return via main roads to Akyaka at the foot of the cliff road that comes down from Mugla.  We coasted into Akyaka (no creaks from steering); caught brief glimpses of some of its famous wood-trimmed houses, stopped to buy fresh bread for a picnic lunch and then, when we started down to the beach to find a picnic spot, disaster struck again – this time the brakes failed.  A quick enquiry at the nearest shop produced the information that there wasn’t a mechanic in Akyaka – the nearest car repair place was at the junction of the Marmaris turn off and main road to Mugla, a couple of kilometres away.

So off we set, driving slowly, but as we went along the brake function came back so, in the end, we drove all the way home and earmarked the car for a visit to our regular mechanic in the Fethiye Sanayi – and we’ll be introducing you to him in our next article.

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