The group had planned to visit Mardin but were advised not to go there due to local problems with the PKK.  Instead they headed for Adiyaman and Nemrut Dağ.

The group had planned to visit Mardin but were advised not to go there due to local problems with the PKK.  Instead they headed for Adiyaman and Nemrut Dağ.

The journey involved crossing the Euphrates (the river Firat in Turkish) from a place called Siverek to Kahta on the opposite bank.

As they waited for the ferry they snapped this colourful group of local women who were pleased to have their picture taken.
 
The ferry was absolutely jam packed and our group were the last vehicle to get on board – thus avoiding a two-hour wait for the next ferry.

Once across the Euphrates they enjoyed magnificent views en route to Nemrut Dağ, where they parked in the car park and made their way up a very steep path from which the snow had only recently been cleared, to reach the eastern terrace on the summit.

Nemrut Dağ is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is actually the tomb of Antiochus 1 who ruled this area, then known as Comagene, during the 1st century BC.

His actual tomb is believed to be somewhere inside the mountain, but has never been found, and what remain are two large terraces on either side of the summit where he had huge statues of gods and himself erected.

Over the centuries earthquakes have toppled the statues and the pieces have been left to lie where they fell.

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