We continue our foreigners survey series.

No-one knows exactly how many foreigners have settled here.  Figures are available for the number of residence permit holders, and records show how many foreigners own land/property – but neither of these figures bears much relation to the actual number of foreigners who live here.  National Police Statistics for 1st March 2007 suggest there were a total of 202,085 foreign holders of residence permits in Turkey as a whole.  The table below gives the numbers of residence permit holders living in Aegean and Mediterranean areas as well as figures for Istanbul and Ankara for comparative purposes.

Province

Reason:  Miscellaneous

reasons

For work

For education

Total

İstanbul

79,594

14,919

11,643

106,156

Antalya

11,365

1,261

206

12,832

Ankara

3,790

2,747

5,620

12,157

İzmir

7,110

675

2,514

10,299

Muğla

4,836

341

28

5,205

Aydın

2,525

37

14

2,576

Total  

109,220

19,980

20,025

149,225

As can be seen from the above table, even when the numbers for the Aegean and Mediterranean provinces of Antalya, Izmir, Muğla and Aydın are added together, the total is a mere 30,912 compared to the 118,313 foreigners resident in Istanbul and Ankara.  Of course we all know many people who leave the country every 90 days to renew a tourist visa.  They effectively live here but are not recorded in the figures shown above.

When we look at the countries of origin of resident permit holders the results are also interesting.  The table below gives figures for residence permit holders from the EU.

Origin

For miscellaneous reasons

For work

For education

Total

Bulgaria

48,064

463

3,260

51,787

Germany

7,970

1,548

384

9,902

Great Britain

6,277

1,493

170

7,940

Greece

3,965

336

2,109

6,410

France

1,822

1,337

152

3,311

Denmark

2,647

131

43

2,821

Romania

1,730

444

158

2,332

Italy

1,006

773

69

1,848

Holland

1,049

285

86

1,420

Poland

513

188

180

881

Total

75,043

6,998

6,611

88,652

Bulgaria has the highest representation which would seem to be because of the high ethnic Turkish population in Bulgaria itself.  The above shows far more German residents than British, whereas in our sample these positions are reversed.  One possible reason for more Germans than Britons holding residence permits is the cost involved.  Permits for German citizens are cheaper than those for the British.

The sample of 504 settled foreigners who completed questionnaires can be broken down into 322 British; 73 German; 36 Dutch; 27 Danish; 14 Irish; 11 Finnish and 17 others.  61% of the sample was female and only 39% male.  It would seem that this is common in social science research, as women are more inclined to complete questionnaires than men, and in the context of an older-age sample, females live longer than males.  Retired people formed the majority of the sample.  Almost 70% of the sample was aged 50 or over.

To find out more about the results, watch out for Part 3.

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